As of todays writing (335), Project 365 has tallied 72,809 feet of vertical gain. I am excited to approach todays question regarding how Diabetes interferes with climbing. The truth is that I don’t think it does. I think that there are always a million reasons not to place ourselves in a position of challenge or uncertainty, but that is just life and human nature. Diabetes is quite simply a reason–either a reason to get after it and be strong, or a reason to say ‘the hell with it’ and stop trying.

I was recently asked if I felt like Project 365 has been a success in terms of raising awareness and empowering people with Diabetes. I believe that the essence of this project has been to really hammer home the idea that Diabetes is simply a reason and that what it prompts us to do is our choice.

A whole bunch of folks who see diabetes as a reason to get outside and push their limits. This is what diabetes means to me. (see the preceding blog post for more details about the Insulindependence Diabetes Wilderness Festival!)

Greg Florian, crushin’ it at the Insulindependence DWF in Joshua Tree!

From what I have learned personally, feedback from others and from the experiences I have shared with a handful of the Diabetes community this past year, I believe that a measure of success has absolutely been attained since that message has been effectively delivered and made real on some level. We cast off into a vast unknown and took risks, had lots of ups and downs, made tons of mistakes and had some amazing “summit moments” too.

I love climbing because it pushes me into situations where I can’t predict what will happen and I have to be present in each moment and trust my ability to respond appropriately. Diabetes does the same thing–it keeps me in that zone of awareness even when I am off the rock. I have accepted that I can’t control everything that happens in my body, and with my blood sugar but I am confident that my responses will be appropriate and sufficient to keep me and my partner safe.

The preceding statements have not been approved by the FDA. Climbing is dangerous in all of its manifestations and if you take advice from ^this guy^ you do so at your own risk.

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